Tag Archives: science

National Parks and Civil Wars

Outamba Kilimi National Park is Sierra Leone’s first national park, and in located in the far north of the country along the Guinean border. The national park is comprised of two non-contiguous areas, Outamba (183,100 acres) and Kilimi (90,900 acres). These protected areas lie at an important transition zone in Sierra Leone’s landscape, where the Upper Guinean Rainforest Ecosystem begins to transition into savanna and open woodland. Continue reading National Parks and Civil Wars

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New species of orangutan found (and there’s a super volcano involved)

Today marks the first time in almost two decades that new species of great ape was discovered. Scientists have found an isolated population of orangutans in Sumatra, Indonesia, and studies show that it is a new species, and that it has been separated from the other population of Sumatran orangutans for over a million years.

Continue reading New species of orangutan found (and there’s a super volcano involved)

Political Change & Climate Change

2015 was the year that over 150 Heads of State and Government, like Vladimir Putin and Barack Obama, attended the Paris Climate Summit where negotiations were held and a Climate Change Accord was signed by representatives of 185 nations. Continue reading Political Change & Climate Change

Into the Amazon

Last month I was fortunate enough to be able to have the trip of a life time that started in the Peruvian Amazon and ended high in the Andes exploring Machu Picchu. Less fortunately I was struck quite ill from the experience. That, on top of general life things and a cross country road trip I’ve been less than active on Endangered Living.  Continue reading Into the Amazon

The History of Women in Natural History

Today I wandered into a used bookstore and came out with several exciting finds. However, I’m only going to be talking about one: “The Great Naturalists” by Thames and Hudson which features predominantly male naturalists, as most accounts of any science pre-20th century tend to do. But hidden in the mini-biographies were two fantastic women: Maria Sibylla Merian and Mary Anning.

Guest Post: Tom in the Jungle

While I faced visa problem after visa problem I found comfort in knowing that one of my cohort, and a great friend, Tom was out in the jungles of Borneo living the dream. Somewhere between May and July of 2015 I asked him to write a guest post, and being the person that I am, I am only getting around to posting it now. Sorry, Tom! But it was worth the wait, he really brings the jungle to life:


 

In this summer of 2015 I had the good fortune to find myself in a Bornean rainforest conducting fieldwork for my MSc. The Sabangau peat-swamp forest in Central Kalimantan was my home for two months. As I write these words my time here is drawing to a close. Read on, if you will, and I will tell you about the remarkable place where I lived and the strange and wonderful things that I saw in my short time living in the jungle.​  Continue reading Guest Post: Tom in the Jungle

Did St. Patrick rid Ireland of serpents?

So Saint Patrick was not always a red-bearded man in a bright green top hat who drank loads and loads of green beer in March, despite what much of the world(or maybe it’s just America?) may think. The real Saint Patrick was a Christian missionary sent to Ireland in the 5th century A.D. and as rumor has it, he drove all of the snakes off of the island of Ireland. But is Saint Patrick the real reason there are no snakes on the Emerald Isle? Continue reading Did St. Patrick rid Ireland of serpents?