Tag Archives: science

Political Change & Climate Change

2015 was the year that over 150 Heads of State and Government, like Vladimir Putin and Barack Obama, attended the Paris Climate Summit where negotiations were held and a Climate Change Accord was signed by representatives of 185 nations. Continue reading Political Change & Climate Change

Into the Amazon

Last month I was fortunate enough to be able to have the trip of a life time that started in the Peruvian Amazon and ended high in the Andes exploring Machu Picchu. Less fortunately I was struck quite ill from the experience. That, on top of general life things and a cross country road trip I’ve been less than active on Endangered Living.  Continue reading Into the Amazon

The History of Women in Natural History

Today I wandered into a used bookstore and came out with several exciting finds. However, I’m only going to be talking about one: “The Great Naturalists” by Thames and Hudson which features predominantly male naturalists, as most accounts of any science pre-20th century tend to do. But hidden in the mini-biographies were two fantastic women: Maria Sibylla Merian and Mary Anning.

Guest Post: Tom in the Jungle

While I faced visa problem after visa problem I found comfort in knowing that one of my cohort, and a great friend, Tom was out in the jungles of Borneo living the dream. Somewhere between May and July of 2015 I asked him to write a guest post, and being the person that I am, I am only getting around to posting it now. Sorry, Tom! But it was worth the wait, he really brings the jungle to life:


 

In this summer of 2015 I had the good fortune to find myself in a Bornean rainforest conducting fieldwork for my MSc. The Sabangau peat-swamp forest in Central Kalimantan was my home for two months. As I write these words my time here is drawing to a close. Read on, if you will, and I will tell you about the remarkable place where I lived and the strange and wonderful things that I saw in my short time living in the jungle.​  Continue reading Guest Post: Tom in the Jungle

Did St. Patrick rid Ireland of serpents?

So Saint Patrick was not always a red-bearded man in a bright green top hat who drank loads and loads of green beer in March, despite what much of the world(or maybe it’s just America?) may think. The real Saint Patrick was a Christian missionary sent to Ireland in the 5th century A.D. and as rumor has it, he drove all of the snakes off of the island of Ireland. But is Saint Patrick the real reason there are no snakes on the Emerald Isle? Continue reading Did St. Patrick rid Ireland of serpents?

The long road to Marokie

Wednesday May 26th, 2014

 

When we woke up we ate some hard boiled eggs before a few students joined Nate on his tour of the sanctuary of Tacugama. I decided to stay behind and enjoy the peace that came with an empty bungalow in the middle of a rainforest. It was such a beautiful place to be with your mind, that I couldn’t bring myself to sacrifice the time I could be alone to wander through the sanctuary surrounded by people.

There are ancient trees here, covered in spots of lichen and orchids. While Lungi was hot and miserable, Tacugama is shaded and stays a pleasantly warm temperature all day, and even cool enough at night for a sweater.

The drive down the mountain

Continue reading The long road to Marokie

Arrival in Lungi

Sunday, May 25th, 2014

 

You see the towns in pictures and documentaries, and you always know you’re lacking something because it’s second hand. Driving through the outskirts of Lungi and seeing how many buildings are crumbling or were never completely built is an overwhelming sight after the clean streets of Schilde. Scraggly chickens and stray dogs run around the brush piles and cooking fires as our car speeds past. The people in torn t-shirts with their bare feet do a double take upon noticing our skin color. The air is thick with the smoke of agricultural fires burning along the side of the road.

Flying into Lungi
Flying into Lungi

Continue reading Arrival in Lungi