Tag Archives: madagascar

Daubentoniidae

Well, I personally think daubentoniidae┬áthis is the most difficult family to memorize, and I don’t quite know why. This family is really unique and contains only one species: the Aye-Aye. These weird little lemurs are the only species left of the daubentoniids after the other went extinct about 1,000 years ago. Continue reading Daubentoniidae

Megaladapidae

Megaladapidae is one of the families of primates that is often argued over by taxonomists. Everyone has an opinion in taxonomy. I have decided to put it as a separate family because honestly, sportive lemurs are pretty cool. Megaladapids were said to be extinct because the taxonomic group originally covered all of the giant lemurs the size of gorillas that use to roam Madagascar. But like most megafauna, it was killed off by humans.

Sportive lemur by Flickr user NH53
Sportive lemur by Flickr user NH53

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Indriidae

Primates in the family Indriidae are also found on the island of Madagascar, but these primates are a bit different from the lemurs we have been talking about so far. The species included in the family indriidae are indris, sifakas, and woolly lemurs. Although I said they were different they still share several commonalities like the fact that indriids are not monkeys, but also lemurs, they are also strepsirrhines who have wet noses, and are diurnal.

Verreaux's Sifaka by Woodlouse on Flickr
Verreaux’s Sifaka by Woodlouse on Flickr

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Lemuridae

Lemuridae is another large family of primates, just like cercopithecidae, as it includes most species of lemur. I mentioned in my last primate families post that all lemurs are found on the island of Madagascar, but something that differs from the cheirogaleidae is that lemurids are diurnal. Diurnal means that they spend most of their time awake during the daylight hours.

Ring-tailed lemurs by Mark Abel
Ring-tailed lemurs by Mark Abel

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Masoala National Park

A little while back I posted about the Aceh Protected Forest, a national park in peril and some ways that it might be improved. But there are still a lot of parks in peril out there, one that especially comes to mind is Masoala National Park in Madagascar. Madagascar has lost 85% of it’s forest to slash and burn farming, but it’s also one of the most unique ecosystems on the planet. How can we keep the lemurs leaping through the quickly falling forests of Madagascar? Well I guess you’ll just have to keep reading…

Silky Sifaka, photo from Creative Commons by "Simpsonafotsy"
Silky Sifaka, photo from Creative Commons by “Simpsonafotsy”

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leaping lemurs

Leaping lemurs! Did you know that lemurs are the most threatened mammals in the world? They are so unique and so important in our evolutionary chain. Lemurs are a type of primate found only on the island country of Madagascar, and no, they are not monkeys. They are prosimians and they need protecting! Luckily researchers are putting their foot down and making firm plans to save these incredible animals.

Photo From WWF
Photo From WWF

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top ten new species of 2012

Recently the International Institute for Species Exploration at Arizona State University chose 10 species that it named the top 10. The species are chosen based on being unique, unusual or even ones that live in treacherous terrain. These new species are not just animals, but include plants and fungus as well!

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