Artist turned Curiosity Correspondent

Recently, I’ve had an incredible obsession with Emily Graslie and her YouTube series, The Brain Scoop. Graslie is a fantastic science communicator and you can tell that she is passionate and that she really knows her stuff, and when she doesn’t, her curiosity for the topic shines through.

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Secret Saola

Along the Laotian and Vietnamese border lives a small forest ox. This creature was only discovered in 1992 and has since only been seen a small number of times. Despite being a new-to-us species, it’s already under threat. This Odd Animal Profile is about the Saola (Pseudoryx nghetinhensis), which is already listed as critically endangered due to habitat loss and hunting. What can we learn about this fascinating animal before it’s too late?

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Chimpanzees and the New York Blood Center

In March of 2015, during the height of the Ebola crisis, the New York Blood Center(NYBC),  a U.S. based research institution, stopped paying for the care of over 60 of its chimpanzees. These chimps which were used in hepatitis research at a center in Liberia, were then left on islands to live out their lives. The research project they were used in was created and funded by the NYBC in partnership with the Government of Liberia.

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Into the Amazon

Last month I was fortunate enough to be able to have the trip of a life time that started in the Peruvian Amazon and ended high in the Andes exploring Machu Picchu. Less fortunately I was struck quite ill from the experience. That, on top of general life things and a cross country road trip I’ve been less than active on Endangered Living.  Continue reading Into the Amazon

The History of Women in Natural History

Today I wandered into a used bookstore and came out with several exciting finds. However, I’m only going to be talking about one: “The Great Naturalists” by Thames and Hudson which features predominantly male naturalists, as most accounts of any science pre-20th century tend to do. But hidden in the mini-biographies were two fantastic women: Maria Sibylla Merian and Mary Anning.

Hidden Lions Found in Ethiopia

In 2012 a study was conducted that examined the genetics of the 20 lions in Ethiopia, a country in Northeastern Africa. The reason that the study targeted these 20 lions is that they were last of their kind. Ethiopian lions tend to be much smaller and darker in color than those found across the rest of the continent, and, as the study found, are genetically unique (though not unique enough to earn species or sub-species status) too. Continue reading Hidden Lions Found in Ethiopia

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