Tag Archives: endangered

Wild Learning through virtual field trips

Have you always wanted to travel to remote jungles but didn’t know how? Maybe your kids are fascinated by exotic wildlife and want to see amazing creatures in their natural habitat? There is an easy way to explore far away places without ever leaving your home, and it has come to Endangered Living. With Wild Learning you and your kids can experience the wonders of Southeast Asia by donating to my research to receive access to this series of virtual field trips. No minimum donation! Continue reading Wild Learning through virtual field trips

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Malayan Sun Bear

Exciting news! I have heard that (if all continues going well visa-wise) I will be including the Bornean Sun Bear Conservation Centre in my study of the effects of volunteer tourism on conservation. These are really interesting little bears, so I thought I would tell you a bit more about them. Continue reading Malayan Sun Bear

Key Deer

So this is my first attempt at anything like this, but I am pretty proud of my first try. Not to mention I edited it on free software on my mother’s laptop while I was home for Christmas, so it could be a bit smoother. I also wish I had left out the bit about the dolphins. I was just so excited to have found them, but unfortunately they were a bit too far away. I wish you could have seen them!

I am probably going to re-edit this footage for something a bit smoother, but I am so excited to share the awesome footage I got of the endangered key deer! So here is a rough cut, I hope you hang on until the end (I know it’s long, I’ll shorten it, I promise) to meet a very special little lady.

Megaladapidae

Megaladapidae is one of the families of primates that is often argued over by taxonomists. Everyone has an opinion in taxonomy. I have decided to put it as a separate family because honestly, sportive lemurs are pretty cool. Megaladapids were said to be extinct because the taxonomic group originally covered all of the giant lemurs the size of gorillas that use to roam Madagascar. But like most megafauna, it was killed off by humans.

Sportive lemur by Flickr user NH53
Sportive lemur by Flickr user NH53

Continue reading Megaladapidae

Indriidae

Primates in the family Indriidae are also found on the island of Madagascar, but these primates are a bit different from the lemurs we have been talking about so far. The species included in the family indriidae are indris, sifakas, and woolly lemurs. Although I said they were different they still share several commonalities like the fact that indriids are not monkeys, but also lemurs, they are also strepsirrhines who have wet noses, and are diurnal.

Verreaux's Sifaka by Woodlouse on Flickr
Verreaux’s Sifaka by Woodlouse on Flickr

Continue reading Indriidae

Jane Goodall speaks from atop a chair at Woburn Safari Park

Forward: This is a long post, but it is my hope that you will make it to the end. Getting the chance to meet someone as inspiring as Jane Goodall is an experience I could not limit to a few hundred words. And although this is a post that may not introduce to you a new species or a conservation crisis, I think that it can introduce you to hope if you will let it.


I arrived exactly one hour early. I stood and watched the meerkats outside of the Woburn Safari Park’s Safari Lodge, biding my time until the doors opened and I could find my seat. Even before seeing Jane Goodall standing a mere 10 feet from me the day was perfect. I had seen my first ever wild pheasant, which could seem silly to many people, but for me it was incredibly exciting. Even the mundane turns magical on the day you get to meet your life-long hero.

Me and Jane
Me and Jane

Continue reading Jane Goodall speaks from atop a chair at Woburn Safari Park

OAP: Great Blue Turaco

One of the few animals I saw on a regular basis while in Sierra Leone was the Great Blue Turaco. The first time I was told by Papanie that the giant blue bird that flew overhead was a turaco I was shocked. The turaco I had worked with in Dallas had barely been half that size! But the more I saw them the more resemblance I saw to Marty, my Dallas-dwelling turaco. So in honor of the Great Blue Turaco and the amazing wildlife of Sierra Leone, lets have them be the next focus for an Odd Animal Profile.

Photo by Nathan Rupert
Photo by Nathan Rupert

Corythaeola cristata. I don’t normally include the scientific names in my O.A.P.s but Corythaeola crostata rolls off of the tongue with such grace. It is a name that couldn’t belong to any other animal than this giant, blue bird.  Continue reading OAP: Great Blue Turaco