Tag Archives: africa

Cercopithecidae

Wow! Cercopithecidae a HUGE primate family! It includes almost all Old World Monkeys. If you need a refresher on what “Old World” means, it means that these monkeys are basically from anywhere that is not South America. Now I did oscillate between splitting this into it’s subfamilies, as some people recognize them as different families, but in the end I decided to put colobinae under cercopithecidae.

Dusky Leaf Monkey by Simpsora on Flickr
Dusky Leaf Monkey by Simpsora on Flickr

Continue reading Cercopithecidae

OAP: Great Blue Turaco

One of the few animals I saw on a regular basis while in Sierra Leone was the Great Blue Turaco. The first time I was told by Papanie that the giant blue bird that flew overhead was a turaco I was shocked. The turaco I had worked with in Dallas had barely been half that size! But the more I saw them the more resemblance I saw to Marty, my Dallas-dwelling turaco. So in honor of the Great Blue Turaco and the amazing wildlife of Sierra Leone, lets have them be the next focus for an Odd Animal Profile.

Photo by Nathan Rupert
Photo by Nathan Rupert

Corythaeola cristata. I don’t normally include the scientific names in my O.A.P.s but Corythaeola crostata rolls off of the tongue with such grace. It is a name that couldn’t belong to any other animal than this giant, blue bird.  Continue reading OAP: Great Blue Turaco

The Great Limpopo Tranfrontier Park

The Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park is one of the largest national parks in the world and one of the few national parks that actually covers multiple countries. This was in hopes to create a protected migration path for a variety of the species found in this park. So lets learn a little bit more about this amazing park.

Rhino at the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park by Andre Van Rooyen
Rhino at the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park by Andre Van Rooyen

Continue reading The Great Limpopo Tranfrontier Park

The Drongo who cried wolf

Did you know that the Drongo, a small bird that lives in the Kalahari desert has been observed crying wolf? That’s right. The Drongo actually calls out false alarm calls to drive away competition. Sounds that are usually reserved for seeing predators are being used to scare off other birds and cause them to drop whatever juicy insect they’ve got their claws on!

Fork-Tailed Drongo by Mike Richardson
Fork-Tailed Drongo by Mike Richardson

Continue reading The Drongo who cried wolf

Southern ground hornbill at The Dallas Zoo

The southern ground hornbill is the largest species of hornbill bird and can be found naturally across the savannas of Africa. These birds are listed as vulnerable, according to the IUCN Red List, but studies done in South Africa suggest they could be in much worse trouble than scientists previously thought. Their habitat is being cleared for farmland and these birds are dying off.

A Southern Ground Hornbill walks the savanna habitat at the Dallas Zoo
A Southern Ground Hornbill walks the savanna habitat at the Dallas Zoo

Continue reading Southern ground hornbill at The Dallas Zoo

christian the lion

By now everyone has seen the memorable reuniting of Christian the lion and his two former owners John Rendall and Anthony Bourk. It has been making its round on the social media circuit for several years, but what do we know of Christian’s story beyond he lived in London for some time before being moved to Kenya to live a free life among other lions. But first, if you haven’t seen the clip that made Christian famous, check it out.

Continue reading christian the lion

drones over the rain forest

Many of us hear the word drone and cringe; we picture the military using drones to drop bombs and other negative things. But recently drones are become cheaper and cheaper as the technology becomes commonplace, so what better path for the drone to take than to aide in conservation!

Continue reading drones over the rain forest

spontaneous classification

A new study suggests that orangutans (and one young gorilla) may be more capable of identifying types of animals than we had previously given them credit for. In the 1700’s Carolus Linneaus gave two names to each species, organizing species for the first time. He classified them in a hierarchical system, starting broad with kingdom, phylum, class, then getting more specific with family, genus, and finally the most specific, species. It took humans an embarrassingly long time to become so organized and look more critically at the animals we share our planet with.
20130912-150947.jpg

Continue reading spontaneous classification

cheetahs on a truck

I’m an avid follower of National Geographic, and although I love their magazine, I am often disappointed with the frequency of animal related news posts on their website. However, their photography does not disappoint, and I think this is one of my favorites.

Photo by Yanai Bonneh on Nat Geo's Your Shot
Photo by Yanai Bonneh on Nat Geo’s Your Shot

Continue reading cheetahs on a truck